Saturday, April 10, 2010

The Idiot's Guide to Faking Your Own Death and Moving to Mexico by Jason Bredle

Decoupaged journal cover by Marion.

I love the poetry of Jason Bredle and the way he plays with language. His books are "A Twelve Step Guide" and "A Pocket Sized Map of My Heart" which is self-published.  The poem below is my favorite of his.   And yes, of course, it's totally about the dragonflies....

The Idiot's Guide to Faking Your Own Death and Moving to Mexico
By Jason Bredle

Every few seconds I check the Bible
to see what Jesus is saying about me. The answer
is always nothing. Sometimes

he's condemning me to eternal damnation,
but usually nothing. Tonight I am alone,
wearing my sex shorts, adrift amongst

the black suburban pools of eternal damnation.
No, I have not been in love. Yes,
I have been in love. I am speaking the language

in which no and yes mean the same, in which
apricot and goodbye mean the same.
I am remembering the kudzu of the awful season,

sitting with you beside the swamp for the last
time and neither of us knowing it was the last
time but yes the glass was hello and dragonfly.

Was it a blessing? They say so in this language.
Others say this language is dying, or already
dead. I speak it, nonetheless, while eating

apricots in the evening of eternal damnation
where you yell at the map and cut your wrist
and there is a darkness here that I have only shared

with my cat, like that guy in the movie who writes
graphic erotica and goes crazy. One says
pain near the black pool of everything,

my back is covered with wax. Every few
seconds I check the Bible to see what Jesus
is saying about me. The answer is always nothing,

aside from the time he lambasted the outfit I wore
to the People's Choice Awards. A green tuxedo.
Tonight, I am adrift in the suburb of the black sky,

I am speaking the language in which love
and apricot mean the same, in which pool
and death mean the same. I said goodbye

in a suburb like this, years ago. I said
goodbye in a suburb like this, years ago.
According to Hercules, if we make an angel

out of ourselves, that is what we are; if we make
a devil out of ourselves, that too is what
we are. See, this is what I am getting at.

It is the awful season and I am speaking
the language in which violence and God mean
the same, in which blood and dragonfly mean

the same. I am in the orchard of eternity
picking the goodbyes of damnation, I am licking
your dragonfly blood and speaking the language

in which pain means hello. A black pool,
a green sky. That is to say, each moment
without you is a vacant airport, each moment

without you is a glass apricot. Every few seconds
I check the Bible to see what Jesus is saying
about me. The answer is always nothing. Except

today, it's a bunch of weird stuff about how
I'm falling into a black pool in some suburb,
maybe Palatine or something, and just like that,

I've gone forever. I know! That's what I thought
too. This is the story, but in this language, this
is not the story. I am eating red ice,

harvesting a field of knives. I am speaking
the language in which heaven and earth mean
the same, in which sky and white mean the same.

O Lord, I made this dragonfly for you. Even
if you do not listen to it, just know, this
is how I have always felt about you. And I

am possessed. And I am a fatalist. Do you see
these bruises? Do you see these bruises?
They are a sad bouquet. They are a beautiful

scrapbook. I am floating. I am in love.
I am dead. On a perfect night, my back is covered
with wax. O Violence, but I did not want this hello.

O Lord, I made this dragonfly for you.
Even if You do not listen to it, just know, I made it
only for you.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Say hello to a dragonfly or two today.  I did.

Blessings,

~Marion~


"Deep in the sun-searched growths the dragonfly
Hangs like a blue thread loosened from the sky."  ~Dante Gabriel Rossetti

+++++++++

What was he doing, the great god Pan,
Down in the reeds by the river?
Spreading ruin and scattering ban,
Splashing and paddling with hoofs of a goat,
And breaking the golden lilies afloat
With the dragonfly on the river.

~Elizabeth Barrett Browning
 
+++++++++
 
From Icarus to present day
Man has wanted WINGS;
Yet the dragonfly can say
"I've always had the things".  ~Jean Walker Fox

++++++++++

10 comments:

quid said...

An intriguing poet, a "worth a second read" poem.

Great post, ML...

quid

lakeviewer said...

Ouch, how you touch so!

Marion said...

Thanks for stopping by, ladies. I appreciate your comments. Blessings!

Kelly said...

I love your journal cover, Marion!!

I haven't seen any dragonflies yet this spring, but I haven't been spending much time outdoors thanks to the pollen. Oh...and remember my drangonfly tree at our pond? The fall/winter winds and flooding took it from me! They'll have to find a different dead tree to sit on!

Cynthia said...

Beautifully powerful poem in a quiet, understated way. The
repetition of the Jesus line begins
to seep into the soul of the
reader.

Wine and Words said...

The language where no and yes mean the same. Yikes...I thought I was the only one who spoke that!

Love
annie

Pam said...

Love the poem AND your journal cover! You're just eaten up with talent, lady! :)

Marion said...

Thank you all for the wonderful comments. They keep me keeping on. Love & Blessings!!

Sue said...

A new poet for me. Thanks.

=)

GYPSYWOMAN said...

i've really missed your fabulous posts of late, lady! and this one is certainly no exception - always full of life and light and love and fun! thank you so much for sharing that little piece of yourSELF! LOVE THIS POST!